Breakfast Cookery 1940

I’m meandering through another vintage cookbook. This time, it’s ‘The Commonsense Cookery Book compiled by the Public School Cookery Teachers Association of New South Wales’.

Settle in, for I’m about to cook you breakfast.

IMG_3280_FotorBeverages first.

Cocoa,  Sir? Madame?  Please note we only serve real cocoa here, none of that sugary powdered drinking chocolate you’ll find in the next Century. Even good old Bournville will contain additional ingredients once it’s acquired by Cadbury.

IMG_3278_FotorNeed more of a caffeine hit?

Of course, Sir.

War rationing has commenced, so we are supplementing some of our café de jour with chicory root. I hear it’s very restorative, Madame.

IMG_3268_FotorCoffee (No. 2) should give you  a hit.

Please, settle in. Read today’s papers. Take in the scenery.

It takes a while to brew.

IMG_3269_FotorNo?  A good, old-fashioned cup of tea instead?  You, Madame, like George Orwell, have excellent taste. He says:

“First of all, one should use Indian or Ceylonese tea. China tea has virtues which are not to be despised nowadays — it is economical, and one can drink it without milk — but there is not much stimulation in it. One does not feel wiser, braver or more optimistic after drinking it. Anyone who has used that comforting phrase ‘a nice cup of tea’ invariably means Indian tea.”

Mr Orwell recommends ’6 heaped teaspoons to every quart’ of water. There are 2 pints in a quart, which equates to three teaspoons of tea to the pint. May I remind Sir, we are on rations, so the tea will be slightly less… strong… than you may be accustomed to.

Ahhh, but we all must do our bit, mustn’t we?

IMG_3271_FotorBut – we still have bacon.

IMG_3273_FotorAnd eggs from the backyard. Or egg, singular. One egg, one slice bacon. Bacon and egg for Sir?

IMG_3275_FotorMadame? Poached egg?

IMG_3281_FotorOr perhaps you would prefer steamed? Particularly good for women who are slimming, I am advised.

IMG_3283_Fotor

IMG_3284_FotorMay I suggest you finish off with some porridge? I’ll have cook set it on the asbestos mat right away, to allow  you time to digest your slice of bacon, egg and a fine, hot brew.

Thank you for dining with us.

*The Commonsense Cookery Book was first published in 1914. This copy, published in 1940, boasts 236,000 issues.

7 responses

  1. I love the Commonsense Cookery Book Shirley… I think mine is a 1970 edition. We first used it in home ec classes in high school. You forgot to mention cooking for invalids and convalescents! : )

  2. Yesterday I found my aunt’s collection of recipes in the back of my pantry. Sadly a mouse has been at them, but many of the pages torn from magazines are quite intact, some going back to 1936. I can’t wait to sit down and go through them!

  3. I am confused with the Steamed Egg.

    4. Stand over saucepan of gently boiling water or in a steamer.

    But my shins may get hot using this method?

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